Jim Stanford, (Photo: CAW/TCA)

Political leaders boast that the Canadian economy has fully recovered from the recession, and that it was not as severe there as it was in other countries. It turns out that both of those claims are false because they don't take population growth into consideration, according to a study released by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA, one of the focal points of Social Watch)

Photo : Crustmania/Flickr/CC

New factors in deforestation like the world economic crisis, speculation in markets for basic products and arable land, and worsening poverty and climate change are aggravating the old causes of this phenomenon such as the advance of agricultural frontiers, tree cutting for timber and fuel, and the use of wood as a fuel. This problem is reported and documented in the Social Watch Report 2012.

Photo: Agência Jovem de Notícias.

“Inequality is the reason why, contradicting all the theories and models, world poverty is not diminishing or is doing so only very slowly even in countries where the economy is growing quickly,” according to Roberto Bissio, the coordinator of Social Watch, speaking at the presentation of the Portuguese edition of the latest annual report by this international network of civil society organizations.

Philip Thigo. (Photo: Indigo Trust)

The Indigo Trust, a foundation based in London that funds technology-driven projects to bring about social change in African countries, awarded the Social Development Network (SODNET, focal point of Social Watch in Kenya) a grant of £30,750 that acknowledges its consistent work to improve the lives of ordinary citizens through its Infonet programme.

Demonstration at Davos. (Photo:
Eliane Baumberger/Aliance Sud)

Fifty "invisible" dogs strayed through the streets of Davos last Wednesday, within sight of the World Economic Forum (WEF). The European Coalition for Corporate Justice drew much attention with a rally, calling to put corporations on a short leash – like the invisible dogs. The heads of Greenpeace International and Amnesty International supported the alliances' core demand: corporations should be required by law to comply with human rights and environmental standards.

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