Social Watch news

Author: 
Jens Martens

The current crises reflect a model blind to environmental and human rights issues and confusing economic growth with progress in society.  A coherent analysis of the common causes of the multiple crises and their interdependencies is needed now. This presupposes overcoming the current fragmentation in the development discourse of politics, science and civil society.

The crisis isn’t over – not without global partnerships on unemployment and environmental sustainability
Jens Martens[1]

Social Watch, along with more than 100 social organizations throughout the world, is calling to mobilize against the false solutions to the global crisis that have been put forward by the Group of 20 developed countries (G20). Organizations in all five continents claim that the proposed financial reforms will only serve to maintain the financial architecture that brought about the crisis, and that the G20 are not proposing far-reaching measures to tackle the very serious situation the planet is facing.

Since it was set-up in 1997, Social Watch Philippines (SWP) has annually put forward a strategy of advocacy, awareness-building, monitoring, organizational development and networking. Based in Quezon City, one of the major cities in Metro Manila, the network that started with twenty seven civil society organizations and individuals has now grown to embrace more than a hundred citizens’ group, networks  and individuals. 

Source: ESCR-net
http://www.escr-net.org

NGO alternative or shadow reporting within the Convention on the Elimination of all forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) and the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (ICESCR) can be strategically utilized to increase awareness on the rights and obligations contained in the treaties and promote integration of all women’s human rights.

A new initiative by the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) called "Regional Project on Child Development Indicators” aims to produce, for the first time, statistical data on child development outcomes for children aged 24 to 59 months in Latin America and the Caribbean.

Today, there are no comparable indicators for the region. The compiled comparable data will allow the measurement of child development in four areas: cognition, socio-emotional, language and emerging academic skills (early notions of reading, writing and mathematical capacity).

How well are individual countries progressing towards the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs)? Despite an extraordinary public campaign to mobilize support for the MDGs, including the UN MDG Summit in New York in September 2010, until now, there has remarkably little effort to track progress at the country level in a way that non-specialists could readily understand.

20 COUNTRIES ALONE CANNOT DEFINE THE DESTINY OF THE ENTIRE WORLD FOR SYSTEM CHANGE AND AN END TO BUSINESS AS USUAL, LET'S BUILD ANOTHER WORLD!

THE PEOPLE WILL NOT CONTINUE TO PAY FOR THE CRISIS.

Join the People's Week of Collective Actions in Seoul, November 6 to 12, 2010 

Author: 
Ana Abelenda

Thursday 7 October (Washington D.C.)
Who is responsible if a hydroelectric project financed by the World Bank displaces a whole population or pollutes rivers? These kinds of questions were raised in debates between representatives of civil society organizations and Bank officials in the forum about policies that affect civil society, which was part of the annual IMF and World Bank Group meetings in Washington DC from 6 to 10 October.

Author: 
Ana Abelenda

Tues 6 Oct (Washington D.C)
The need to build a new development paradigm with alternative measures that can provide evidence based development policies was the subject of discussions at the kick-off of the Civil Society Policy Forum of the WB and IMF Annual Meetings taking place here in Washington D.C. 6-10 October 2010. Is there a shifting trend in the way governments design development policies for social progress?

Author: 
Roberto Bissio, Third World Institute

Source: Civicus

The annual meeting of the governors of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and World Bank in the first week of October is traditionally an occasion for protesters to rally against the system and criticise these sister institutions created at Bretton Woods at the end of World War II.

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