The “leave no one behind” slogan and the proposition to increase funding “from billions to trillions” made by the development banks and the International Monetary Fund are the two policy messages most commonly heard at the debate around the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) that started yesterday at the United Nations. “You cannot have both at the same time” commented Roberto Bissio, coordinator of Social Watch, summarizing the analysis of the first SDG by the global Spotlight report, the major comprehensive independent assessment of the SDGs launched during the HLPF.

This is not just about ODA but also about fighting tax evasion and recovering the assets stolen or illegally transferred to fiscal havens” said Roberto Bissio, coordinator of Social Watch, speaking on behalf of the Civil Society Financing for Development Group during an official session of the High Level Political Forum at the UN. Bissio said tax collaboration is essential and it should happen at the UN. Yet, there is a trend not to complement the Global Partnership but to substitute it with multiple PPPs that are non-transparent and not accountable. Recent Latin American experience additionally links PPPs with corruption on a massive scale.

Mr. Bissio participated at the Thematic review: "Eradicating poverty and promoting prosperity in a changing world: Multi-stakeholder perspectives" that took place on July 11, 2017 during the Highl-level Political Forum in the United Nations, New York.

Photo: Maailma Kylässä

The government published the national implementation plan of the SDGs in February 2017. Economic growth and business opportunities are emphasized throughout the plan. Several CSOs have been critical about this approach because it will not reduce global inequality or help conserve natural resources for future generations. The economy should be a tool to achieve sustainable welfare and growth should not be seen an absolute value as such. Finnish CSOs have underlined that the social and ecological responsibility in businesses requires, besides dialogue, binding legislation. France and the Netherlands have legislated recently that businesses active in these countries must take care of human rights along the entire supply chain.

Colombia’s National Development Plan 2014-2018 prioritizes the development of the different productive sectors, mainly the infrastructure sector, energy and mining, as well as hydrocarbons, encouraging the participation of private firms. The Colombian government proposes that the mining-energy and hydrocarbon sectors will play a key role in ensuring sustained and inclusive economic development, as they will generate significant resources to finance investments that serve to consolidate peace and fight against inequality. However, the productive sectors mentioned have been one of the main focuses of social conflict in the country because of their impact on human rights and the environment.

Global report assesses how privatization and corporate capture have become obstacles to progress under the 2030 Agenda

New York, 10 July 2017: A global coalition of civil society organizations and trade unions presents today the report Spotlight on Sustainable Development 2017. It is published on the opening day of the High Level Political Forum at the United Nations in New York. The report provides the most comprehensive independent assessment of the implementation of the 2030 Agenda and its Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

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