Social Watch E-Newsletter - Issue 292 - March 17, 2017

Issue 292 - March 17, 2017

Women rights without borders: Combatting inequalities is key to women’s empowerment


The economic empowerment of women is the priority theme for the 2017 UN Commission on the Status of Women with special attention to the empowerment of indigenous women.
The struggle to empower women and to combat gender inequality goes hand in hand with the struggle for women’s human rights. The increasing application of human rights instruments from local to global continues to be the hallmark of organizing that crosses sectors, policy tracks and borders. The work of human rights advocates and defenders has required establishing new rules and systems as well as removing discrimination and bias in the application of existing ones. This is as relevant across territorial borders as within them and the gap between transnational economic activities and global economic governance can magnify inequalities or nullify measures to overcome them.Read more



Human trafficking in the digital era, trauma and the involvement of the Eritrean regime


The book "Human Trafficking and Trauma in the Digital Era: The Ongoing Tragedy of Trade in Refugees from Eritrea" sheds new light on the thriving business of human trafficking for ransom with severe torture practices, also named Sinai trafficking, and traces back its origins. The book shows how money is made with the smuggling of Eritrean refugees and how the booming business runs with inhuman practices such as violence, hostage situations and torture. The Eritrean community suffers collective trauma, bearing witness to the abuse of family members and fellow nationals through mobile phones and digital social networks.  Read more



Finance: Most financial inflows not developmental


Contrary to popular belief, capital has been flowing from developing to developed countries for many years, peaking at US$800 billion in 2008 when the financial crisis erupted. Net transfers from developing countries in 2016 came close to US$500 billion, slightly more than in 2015. These trends in international finance have problematic implications for developing countries.
The recently released United Nations report, World Economic Situation and Prospects 2017 (WESP 2017), recognizes these problems, especially as they are relevant to the financing requirements for achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).  Read more



Invitation to contribute to the 2017 report


Social Watch will again join forces with other NGOs and networks to publish in 2017 a new "Spotlight report" (as opposed to "shadow report") on sustainable development.
This report will be launched next July during the meeting of the High Level Political Forum of the United Nations that will review at ministerial level the Agenda 2030 and its 17 Sustainable Development Goals.
Almost two years after the adoption of this ambitious agenda, the 2017 report will look at how it is implemented. The Guidelines for the Social Watch national reports 2017 are available in EnglishFrench and Spanish



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