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Erradicar la pobreza extrema para el año 2030, una aspiración central de los Objetivos de Desarrollo Sostenible (ODS) de Naciones Unidas, es posible, pero sería necesario cambiar los actuales enfoques de política pública impulsados en el mundo, de acuerdo con un estudio.

Elaborado por una coalición de organismos civiles y sindicatos, el documento señaló que la erradicación es posible con los recursos económicos actuales en el mundo, pero las políticas públicas que podrían lograr ese propósito han sido severamente debilitadas en las últimas décadas.

Global Spotlight Report says that the Agenda 2030 proposal to eradicate poverty by 2030 is achievable but tax policies need to change.

“The promise made by governments to eradicate poverty by 2030 is doable if countries cooperate to fight tax evasion and capital flights” argues an independent report submitted to the High Level Political Forum of the United Nations as an input to its debate today around the first of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

The “leave no one behind” slogan and the proposition to increase funding “from billions to trillions” made by the development banks and the International Monetary Fund are the two policy messages most commonly heard at the debate around the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) that started yesterday at the United Nations. “You cannot have both at the same time” commented Roberto Bissio, coordinator of Social Watch, summarizing the analysis of the first SDG by the global Spotlight report, the major comprehensive independent assessment of the SDGs launched during the HLPF.

This is not just about ODA but also about fighting tax evasion and recovering the assets stolen or illegally transferred to fiscal havens” said Roberto Bissio, coordinator of Social Watch, speaking on behalf of the Civil Society Financing for Development Group during an official session of the High Level Political Forum at the UN. Bissio said tax collaboration is essential and it should happen at the UN. Yet, there is a trend not to complement the Global Partnership but to substitute it with multiple PPPs that are non-transparent and not accountable. Recent Latin American experience additionally links PPPs with corruption on a massive scale.

Mr. Bissio participated at the Thematic review: "Eradicating poverty and promoting prosperity in a changing world: Multi-stakeholder perspectives" that took place on July 11, 2017 during the Highl-level Political Forum in the United Nations, New York.

Photo: Maailma Kylässä

The government published the national implementation plan of the SDGs in February 2017. Economic growth and business opportunities are emphasized throughout the plan. Several CSOs have been critical about this approach because it will not reduce global inequality or help conserve natural resources for future generations. The economy should be a tool to achieve sustainable welfare and growth should not be seen an absolute value as such. Finnish CSOs have underlined that the social and ecological responsibility in businesses requires, besides dialogue, binding legislation. France and the Netherlands have legislated recently that businesses active in these countries must take care of human rights along the entire supply chain.

Colombia’s National Development Plan 2014-2018 prioritizes the development of the different productive sectors, mainly the infrastructure sector, energy and mining, as well as hydrocarbons, encouraging the participation of private firms. The Colombian government proposes that the mining-energy and hydrocarbon sectors will play a key role in ensuring sustained and inclusive economic development, as they will generate significant resources to finance investments that serve to consolidate peace and fight against inequality. However, the productive sectors mentioned have been one of the main focuses of social conflict in the country because of their impact on human rights and the environment.

Global report assesses how privatization and corporate capture have become obstacles to progress under the 2030 Agenda

New York, 10 July 2017: A global coalition of civil society organizations and trade unions presents today the report Spotlight on Sustainable Development 2017. It is published on the opening day of the High Level Political Forum at the United Nations in New York. The report provides the most comprehensive independent assessment of the implementation of the 2030 Agenda and its Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

Invitation to Side Event at the HLPF 2017 SDG 1 and Inequality organized by the Government of Togo, Global Call to Action Against Poverty (GCAP), Social Watch, International Forum of NGO Platforms (IFP), ATD Fourth World, Action for Sustainable Development, African Platform for Social Protection, Asia Civil Society Partnership on Sustainable Development (APSD) and CIVICUS World Alliance for Citizen Participation.

Sarah Makau, Kenya

"What we have to ask ourselves is this: is Africa in control of our resources or is Africa entangled in this global system of accumulation which was brought by colonialism? How do we escape that bondage?" summarized Mela Chiponda, a participant at the Second annual WoMin Feminist School, hosted by Netright Ghana.

"We didn't have title deeds, the land was not demarcated, nobody knew the acreage of their farms. So when we learned about this, the government came in and started to demarcate. and there was pause in the mining activities. But we are worried. It feels like a lion we have chased off, and it's lying in the grass waiting" said Sarah Makau, from Kenya.

Increasing oil and gas production while at the same time trying to reduce carbon emissions are conflicting priorities, argues a joint study by the University of Victoria, the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives and the Parkland Institute. The Climate Leadership Plan of the province of Alberta allows to expanding oil sands production by 53 per cent and emissions by 47 per cent above 2014 levels. To compensate and still meet Canada’s Paris Agreement commitments the rest of the Canadian economy should reduce emissions by 47 per cent by 2030. This will be virtually impossible in the time remaining barring an economic collapse.

Three new pipelines have been approved in Canada and a fourth (Energy East) is under review even though oil supply forecasts show that not all are needed. This shows, according to the study that "Canada has no energy strategy beyond liquidating its remaining non-renewable resources as fast as possible to serve the economic interests of governments of the day. What we really need is a comprehensive energy strategy that addresses both the future energy security of Canadians and Canada’s commitments on climate change".

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