Social Watch news

Tanzanians have been urged to use their power of influence through mass protests and other available avenues to stop corrupt leaders from using government resources for their personal interests.

On October 21st, 2003, the Resident Coordinator of the United Nations System and the United Nations Team in Uruguay launched the report entitled "Millennium Development Goals in Uruguay. A background paper for the national discussion".
The panelists in the event were Mr. Pedro Daniel Weinberg, Resident Coordinator a.i. of the United Nations in Uruguay; Mr. Roberto Bissio, Social Watch; Mr. Omar Sellanes, President of the National Association of Non Governmental Organizations for Development (ANONG); and Mr. Leonardo Costa, Pro-Secretary of the Presidency of the Republic.

On November 18 Ibase organized the IV Dialogues against Racism that brought together forty civil society organizations. Actions that have proven effective in the combat against racial preconception in the country were introduced and ways were discussed to engage institutions, businesses and people in a single permanent coordination.

Citizens’ Observatory/Social Watch and the Commission of External Relations and National Defense of the Senate invite to the launch of the Citizens’ Observatory 2003 report, "População pobre versus mercado", wich will take place at the Federal Senate, Brasilia, on December 4, 9:30 am.

“Coordinadora Civil” from Nicaragua, the national Social Watch focal point, denounces serious irregularities in the national budget before public authorities and international financial institutions.

Montevideo, 30 April 2004 - Today the commitment made by the Uruguayan Government to work together with civil society to define social development goals based on the United Nations' Millennium Development Goals was reaffirmed by Ariel Davrieux, Head of the Planning and Budget Ministry, during the ceremony at which UN representatives formally presented the Uruguayan Government and civil society with the results of the consultation process around these goals that took place between October 2003 and March 2004.

Previous to the official launching of the Social Watch 2004 report in New York, authors of the report discussed its conclusions in Washington with advocacy NGOs involved in campaigning around trade and financial issues.

“Frustrating the hopes of peoples and nations all around the globe will certainly not help make the world a more secure place for our children” concludes the Social Watch report 2004, summarizing the findings of citizen coalitions in 50 countries, poor and rich, about what they see as main obstacles to human security.

Social Watch Report 2004 was launched in a press conference that was broadcasted through the Internet last April 26th.

Miloon Kothari, UN Special Rapporteur on the right to housing highlighted that the very serious situation in Brazil with respect to homelessness, landlessness, housing deficit and housing inadequacy results from the historic discrimination against the black community and indigenous people, and the marginalization of the poor.

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